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A review of- Doodletopia Cartoons by Christopher Hart


 

DoodletopiaCartoons

Review of Doodletopia Cartoons, by Christopher Hart

When I came across Doodletopia I knew I would get this book, but not just for myself, but for the purpose of drawing more with my kids. Since my kids could first pick up a pencil, they have desired to draw and paint just like mom. I do what I can to encourage them, but often find it hard to create the time to sit and draw with them. I was so excited to review this book, for I recalled my younger artistic self always with a pencil and paper in hand, ready to draw, but not always knowing what to draw. Sometimes I would skip out on drawing all together, for lack of ideas. What I lack in my ability to draw as well as I paint, I blame on my lack of practice when I was younger. I now know, you don’t always need a purpose or reason to draw, you just need to do it. Any form of drawing will better your skill. This book will will be a fun way to get my hands and brain moving when I’m having one of my blank spells, or just need something to doodle.

 
Christopher Hart has many, many books on drawing, from books on Doodling, to books on the Human Figure, all ranging in skill from beginner to expert. When I got the opportunity to review this book, I jumped on it, with pure curiosity, to see how one can create a book purely on doodles. Christopher Hart starts his book with the basic guidelines to drawing a cartoon face. The center line and eye line are the most common way to start the layout of a face. He then moves on to warm ups, building easy character out of basic shapes. His step-by-step examples make it easy to learn the basic form used for drawing cartoon characters and people. The last step he leaves you to draw your own character or person following his example. This page also comes with a witty tip to enhance your drawing skills. I must say, one of the things I liked about this book was the casual yet humorous narration given by Christopher Hart. He practically gives each of his characters a life and personality of their own. Some of his phrases, I feel, are more directed at teens or young adults, so I wouldn’t consider this book for young kids outside of the drawing aspect.

 
The chapters following this each give you practice in drawing, from copying the other half of a character or scene, to drawing different expressions, a section where you can choose and design a different animal from the same outline, or play dress up by drawing the clothes on characters already drawn out for you, and even a calligraphy portion, which we can all admit was probably the most common form of doodling during your school years. Who hasn’t written in bubble letters before? My son’s favorite section of this book, of course, was the “Draw your own Inventions” chapter. My son aspires to be an inventor of sorts, and he already spends his days drawing up inventions. In this section, Christopher gives you a part of an invention, and leaves you to come up with the rest. I feel it will be a great way to inspire my son to draw more, and help encourage his creativity. Altogether, I’d say Christopher Hart did a good job creating a book that will inspire creativity in people of many ages.

 

 

-I Received this book for free through Blogging For Books in exchange for an honest review. All opinions given are strictly my own.

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